REPERTOIRE

REPERTOIRE is Quanterion’s set of five on-line interactive reliability engineering training courses developed around the American Society for Quality (ASQ) body of knowledge for the Certified Reliability Engineer’s (CRE) exam.

Outline

(1) Reliability Management

  •  Strategic Management
    • Benefits of Reliability Engineering
      • How reliability techniques improve programs, processes, and services
    • Interrelationship of quality and reliability
      • Define and describe quality and reliability and how they related to each other
    • Role of reliability function in the organization
      • Demonstrate how reliability professionals can apply the techniques and interact effectively with marketing, safety and product liability, engineering, manufacturing, logistics, etc.
    • Reliability in product and process development
      • Integrate reliability engineering techniques with other development activities (e.g., concurrent engineering)
    • Failure consequence and liability management
      • Use liability and consequence limitation objectives to determine reliability acceptance criteria, and identify development and tset methods that verify and validate these criteria.
    • Life-cycle cost management
      • Determine the impact of failures in terms of service and cost (both tangible and intangible) throughout a product’s life-cycle.
    • Customer needs assessment
      • Describe how various feedback mechanisms (e.g., QFD, prototyping, beta testing) help determine customer needs and specify product and service requirements
    • Project management
      • Interpret basic project management tools and techniques, such as Gantt chart, PERT chart, critical path, resource planning, etc.
  • Reliability Program Management
    • Terminology
      • Identify and define basic reliability terms such as MTTR, MTBF, availability, failure rate, dependability, maintainability, etc.
    • Elements of a reliability program
      • Use customer requirements and other inputs to develop a reliability program including elements such as design for reliability, progress assessment, FRACAS, monitoring and tracking components, customer satisfaction, and other feedback, etc.
    • Product life-cycle and costs
      • Identify the various life-cycle stages and their relationship to reliability, and analyze various cost-related issues including product maintenance, life expectation, duty cycle, software defect phase containment, etc.
    • Design evaluation
      • Plan and implement product and process design evaluations to assess reliability at various life-cycle stages using validation, verification, or other review techniques.
    • Requirements management
      • Describe how requirements management methods are used to help prioritize design and development activities.
    • Reliability training programs
      • Demonstrate the need for training, develop a training plan, and evaluate training effectiveness.
  • Product Safety and Liability
    • Roles and responsibilities
      • Define and describe the roles and responsibilities of a reliability engineer in terms of safety and product liability.
    • Ethical issues
      • Identify appropriate ethical behaviors for a reliability engineer in various situations.
    • System safety program
      • Identify safety-related issues by analyzing customer feedback, design data, field data, and other information sources.
      • Use risk assessment tools such as hazard analysis, FMEA, FMECA, PRAT, FTA, etc. to identify and prioritize safety concerns, and identify steps to idiot-proofonf safety concerns, products and processes to minimize risk exposure

(2) Probability and Statistics for Reliability

  • Basic Concepts
    • Statistical terms
      • Define and use basic terms such as population, parameter, statistic, random sample, the central limit theorem, etc. and compute the expected values.
    • Basic probability concepts
      • Define and use probability concepts such as independence, mutually exclusive, complementary, and conditional probability, joint occurrence of events, etc. and compute expected values.
    • Discrete and continuous probability distributions
      • Describe, apply and distinguish between various distributions (binomial, Poisson, exponential, Weibull, normal, log-normal, etc.) and their functions (cumulative distribution functions (CDFs), probability density functions (PDFs), hazard functions, etc.)
      • Apply these functions to related concepts such as the bathtub curve.
    • Statistical process control
      • Define various SPC terms and describe how SPC is related to reliability.
  • Statistical Inference
    • Point and interval estimates of parameters
      • Define and interpret these estimates.
      • Obtain then and interpret them using probability plots, maximum likelihood methods, etc.
      • Analyze the efficiency and bias of the estimators
    • Statistical interval estimates
      • Compute confidence intervals, tolerance intervals, etc. and draw conclusions from the results.
    • Hypothesis testing (parametric and non parametric)
      • Apply hypothesis testing for parameters such as means, variance, and proportions.
      • Apply and interpret significance levels to Type I and Type II errors for accepting /rejecting the null hypothesis.
    • Bayesian technique
      • Describe the advantages and limitations of this technique.
      • Define elements including prior, likelihood, and posterior probability distributions, and compute values using Bayes formula.

(3) Reliability in Design and Development

  • Reliability Design Techniques
    • Use factors
      • Identify and characterize various use factors (e.g., temperature, humidity, vibration, corrosives, pollutants) and stresses (e.g., secerity of service, electrostatis discharge (ESD), radio frequency interference (RFI), throughput) to which product may be subjected.
    • Stress-strength analysis
      • Apply this technique and interpret the results.
    • Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) in design
      • Apply the techniques and concepts and evaluate the results of FMEA during the design phase
    • Failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) in design
      • Apply the techniques and concepts and evaluate the results of FMECA during the design phase
    • Fault tree analysis (FTA) in design
      • Apply this technique at the design phase to eliminate or minimize undesired events
    • Tolerance and worst case analyses
      • Use the various analysis techniques (e.g., root sum squared, extreme value, statistical tolerancing) to characterize variation that affects reliability.
    • Robust design approaches
      • Define terms such as dependent and dependent variables, factors, levels, responses, treatment, error, replication, etc.
      • Plan and conduct design of experiments (full factorial, fractional factorial, etc.) or other method.
      • Analyze the results and use them to achieve robustness.
    • Human factors reliability
      • Describe how human factors influence the use and performance of products and systems.
    • Design for X (DFX)
      • Apply tools and techniques to enhance a product’s producibility and seviceability, including design for assembly,, service, manufacturability, testibility, etc.
  • Parts and Systems Management
    • Parts selection
      • Apply the techniques such as parts standardization, parts reduction, parallel model, software reuse, etc. to improve reliability in products, systems, and processes.
    • Material selection and control
      • Apply probabilistic methods for proper selection of materials.
    • Derating methods and principles
      • Use methods such as S-N diagram, stress-life relation, etc. to determine the relationship between applied stress and rated value.
    • Establishing specifications
      • Identify various terms related to reliability, maintainability, and serviceability (e.g., MTBF, MTTF, MTBR, MTBUMA, and service interval) as they related to product specifications.

(4) Reliability Modeling and Predictions

  • Reliability Modeling
    • Sources of reliability data
      • Identify and describe various types of data (e.g. public, common, in-house data) and their advantages and limitations, and use data from various sources (prototype, development, test, field, etc.) to measure and enhance product reliability.
    • Reliability block diagrams and models
      • Describe, select, and use various types of block diagrams and models (e.g., series, parallel, partial redundancy, time-dependent-modeling) and analyze them for reliability.
    • Simulation techniques
      • Identify, select, and apply various simulation methods (e.g., Monte Carlo, Markov) and describe their advantages and limitations.
  • Reliability Predictions
    • Part count predictions and parts stress analysis
      • Use part failure rate data to estimate system-and-subsystem level reliability.
    • Advantages and limitations of reliability predictions
      • Demonstrate the advantages and limitations of reliability predictions, how they can be used to maintain or improve reliability, and how they relate to and can be used with field reliability data.
    • Reliability prediction methods for repairable and non-repairable devices
      • Identify and use appropriate prediction methods for these types of devices and systems.
    • Reliability apportionment/allocation
      • Describe the purpose of reliability apportionment/allocation and its relationship to subsystem requirements, and identify when to use equal apportionment or other techniques.

(5) Reliability Testing

  • Reliability Test Planning
    • Elements of a reliability test plan
      • Determine the appropriate elements and reliability test strategies for various development phases.
    • Types and applications of reliability testing
      • Identify and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of various reliability test strategies within available resource constraints
    • Test environment considerations
      • Evaluate the application environment (including combinations of stresses) to determine the appropriate reliability test environment.
  • Development Testing
  • Assess the purpose, advantages, and limitations of each of the following types of tests, and use common models to develop plans, evaluate risks, and interpret test results.
    • Accelerated life tests (e.g., single-stress, multiple-stress, sequential stress)
    • Step-stress testing (e.g., HALT)
    • Reliability growth testing (e.g., Duane, AMSAA, TAAF)
    • Software testing (e.g., white-box, fault-injection)
  • Product Testing
  • Assess the purpose, advantages, and limitations of each of the following types of tests, and use common models to develop plans, evaluate risks, and interpret test results.
    • Qualification/demonstration testing (e.g., sequential tests, fixed-length tests)
    • Product reliability acceptance testing (PRAT)
    • Stress screening (e.g., ESS, HASS, burn-in tests)
    • Attribute testing (e.g., binomial, hypergeometric)
    • Degradation testing (e.g., Arrhenius)
    • Software testing (e.g., black-box, operational profile)